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Posts Tagged ‘Our words’

This is too cute not to share.

Our daughter Jessica melted our hearts a couple of days ago when she shared with us a precious moment that occurred with our granddaughter Mae.

Mae just turned 2 but, in some respects, is advanced beyond her two years.

What occurred points to the value of parents who allow their love for the Lord to overflow in visible fashion.

Here’s what Jessica wrote in her mommy-daughter journal that she’s keeping as Mae grows up:

 

“Today I was desperately trying to get you to take a nap so I laid down with you and asked if you wanted to sing a song. You started saying “Missing geese! Missing geese!”

I couldn’t figure out what song you were referring to so I asked you how it went and you started singing “Missing geese” to the tune of “Amazing Grace.”

“It was incredibly precious.”

Wow.

Mae has heard her parents sing Amazing Grace and even though she didn’t have the lyrics down pat, she gave it her best shot.

And what a shot it was.

For her to choose “Missing geese” as what she wanted to sing is very inspiring.

Actually, it’s amazing.

When somebody we love is drained and needing a boost, perhaps we should start singing “Missing geese” to them in the adult form of Amazing Grace.

Thanks, Jessica and Dave for being such visibly godly parents and wonderful ambassadors of the parenting truths found in Deuteronomy 6:4-9.

Let’s all look for opportunities to guide children toward the amazing grace of our Lord.

As always, I love you

Martin

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I want to be more like God.

I will never be God, something my imperfections remind me of quite frequently.

But I can certainly strive to imitate His nature.

Only good things will result from my demonstrating these characteristics so aptly described by the psalmist:

“But you, O Lord, are a God of compassion and mercy, slow to get angry and filled with unfailing love and faithfulness.” (Psalm 86:15)

Do those around me want to see me display compassion and mercy and slowness to anger and unfailing love and faithfulness?

Of course.

People in your life want to see the same from you.

How much more influence would we have at work or home or school if people thought, “Yeah, that __________, he/she is so compassionate, so gracious, so cool-tempered, so loving and so godly.”

Let’s be like God, my friends.

God will love it.

And so will those whom God has placed into our lives.

As always, I love you
Martin

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One morning, you hear the voice of the Lord calling you to take a few days off from work to go do something ministry-related.

Your heart and soul are convinced that this is the right thing to do because of the anticipated benefit for the Kingdom.

It might be a short-term missions trip to help dig a well in a parched village. It might be for four or five days to repair plumbing and electrical stuff at a low-income elderly relative’s house.

Perhaps it is simply the spending of time with a profoundly grieving sibling whose spouse just died.

In any of the above cases, it’s a matter of serving God by serving others.

But how do you get the time off unless you ask for it?

And how do you get the time off unless you’re in good standing with your boss?

Listen, we never know in advance when we’re going to be needed somewhere other than our job and we’ll have to ask for time off.

That’s why it is SO important to build a good reputation with our employer so that he or she is more willing to accommodate our request.

If we’re known as an employee with a rotten attitude or lazy tendencies, our request might not be honored.

But if we’re always loyal to our employer and work hard when on the clock in order to promote the employer’s best interests, our request will have a much better chance of success.

I encourage you to read of how this principle served the Kingdom of God more than 400 years before Christ.

This was the case with Nehemiah and you can read about it here.

Clearly, Nehemiah was respected and appreciated by his employer who not only granted the time off but also provided lots of material and security support for a very challenging mission.

It was Nehemiah’s years of faithful, godly service to a pagan king that paved the way for the granting of this ministry request.

Please be the best employee you can, always looking to serve your employer’s best interests.

For you never know when you’ll need to ask the employer a favor that will allow you to carry the favor of the Lord to someone else who needs it. As always, I love you Martin

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It’s almost August and a good time to hold ourselves accountable.

Do we make clear and repeated efforts to say and do encouraging things to each of our family members?

Are we known within our congregation as a person who seeks to encourage everybody? Or just a certain few that are our “peeps?”

If I go through our church directory and cannot recall a time when I encouraged each person who attends, then I’ve got work to do.

I need to look for opportunities to encourage each person in my life, even if I’ve never received encouragement from that person.

The Apostle Paul clearly had the gift of encouragement and it overflowed once again in chapter 14 of his letter to the church at Rome:

“So then, let us aim for harmony in the church and try to build each other up.” (NLT).

If I’m not encouraging all the people in my church circle, I’m falling short of what God expects from me and what others need from me.

I’ve got work to do.

Perhaps you do, too, in your circle of influence at home and at church.

Let’s aim carefully.

Let’s let our love for God overflow into the lives of others as we thank them for the good things they do, the kind words they say, the helpful gifts they provide, the disciplined commitment to attend worship and read the Bible and for their God-honoring choices to vigilantly resist Satan’s temptations.

It’s what faith family members are supposed to do.

As always, I love you
Martin

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We all need more real friends.

And more people need us to act as real friends.

We can have plenty of acquaintances we label as friends.

But unless those people are actually willing to intercede to help us when needed, are they really friends?

If we’re not willing to help somebody that we’ve described as our friend, are we really their friend?

God knows that we want and need real friends, loyal friends, interceding friends.

People we can trust to help us, not harm us.

If someone gossips about us, are they our friend?

If someone insults us, are they our friend?

If someone sees us in need and chooses not to help in any way, are they our friend?

Friends love. And that means, according to I Cor. 13:4, they always protect.

I want to be a real friend to more people.

And that means I need to be more diligent in seeking ways to help others, encourage others, defend others, pray for/with others.

Solomon described our vision for friendship in Proverbs 18:24 —

“There are “friends” who destroy each other, but a real friend sticks closer than a brother.”

Let’s strive to build friendships that are not contingent upon circumstances but instead upon the leading of God to love in an enduring, interceding, encouraging, sacrificing way.

After all, there’s nothing better than experiencing a loyal love.

As always, I love you
Martin

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